Funeral Services

Elite Funeral caters to all types of funerals in Singapore. Besides funerals for different races and religions, our services also include simple farewells and luxurious send-offs. Most importantly, we offer a one-stop funeral service so that you can count on us in managing not only the logistics, but also the venue and all other arrangements.

Funeral Packages

Firstly, our funeral packages are customized specially to meet your funeral needs for different religions, traditions, customs, and rites in the Singapore community. Above all, Elite Funeral Services strives to help give your loved ones a proper send-off without worrying about the high costs and troubles during this difficult time. To find out more, please check out our funeral services below.

Funeral Parlour

Besides void deck funerals, holding funeral wakes in a funeral parlour is also a popular and affordable choice in Singapore nowadays. Because these funeral parlours (available in various locations) can provide a more conducive environment and more comfort such as restrooms and air conditioned areas when receiving guests to pay their last respects to the deceased.

First time planning a funeral?
Read our step-by-step guide on preparing a funeral in Singapore here:

Preparing for a funeral is a sensitive subject no doubt, but it is something that we can’t avoid in our life. Here’s a quick step-by-step guide to help you with preparing a dignified funeral when your loved one passes on. 

No time to read now? Click here to download this funeral guide in PDF to your device first

preparing a funeral for a loved one in Singapore

Step 1: Certifying the Cause of Death of Your Loved One

Within 24 hours of the death, you must register the death of your loved one and obtain the Certificate of Cause of Death (CCOD). This certificate can be issued by a doctor if they know the cause of death (natural death). 

This applies to death in the hospital or at home. In the cases where the cause of death cannot be identified (unnatural death), the doctor will refer the matter to the police and the body will be sent to the Mortuary@HSA for a coroner to determine the cause of death.

autopsy by coroner to determine cause of unnatural death

A professional coroner will review the cause of death and inform you if an autopsy is required. You will also be informed of when to claim the body of the deceased.

When going to the Mortuary@HSA, please bring along your NRIC/passport, the deceased NRIC/passport/birth certificate, and all the medicines and medical documents of the deceased.

What happens at a mortuary

Costs Involved to Obtain the Certificate of Cause of Death (CCOD)

The Certificate of Cause of Death (CCOD) will be issued at no charge if your loved one passed away in the hospital.

However, if the deceased passed away while receiving palliative care at home, a doctor is required to certify the death. The cost for this doctor house call  usually ranges around S$200 to S$350, depending on the provider. 

doctor house call to determine the cause of death

No autopsy is necessary for natural deaths such as death from a known disease, acute heart failure, or an accident. In the case of an unnatural death though, an autopsy may be ordered to help determine the cause of the death. The cost of such autopsies will be absorbed and you can get a copy of the autopsy report at a fee of S$160.50.

For families who prefer to order a private autopsy, the procedure will cost around S$6,000 plus daily storage fee of S$165.85 from the third day onwards. 

Step 2: Registering the Death for the Deceased

You do not need to register the death separately if the body is sent to Mortuary@HSA because the death will be registered there and the Death Certificate will be issued there too. 

Otherwise, once you’ve obtained the Certificate of Cause of Death (CCOD), please bring along with the informant’s and deceased’s NRIC/passport/birth certificate to register the death:

  • At the hospital, if death occurred there
  • At the Police Headquarters or any Neighbourhood Police Centre for all other deaths
  • At the Registry of Births and Deaths at the Immigration & Checkpoint Authority’s (ICA) Citizen Services Centre (8.00 am – 4.30 pm on Monday to Friday, and 8.00 am – 12.30 pm on Saturday). Registration and collection of the death certificate will be processed within the same day.

Step 3: Placing An Obituary in the Local Newspapers (Optional)

You may place an obituary (a notice of death) in memory of the deceased in the local newspapers such as The Straits Times, Today, Lianhe Zaobao, Shin Min Daily News, Berita Harian, and Tamil Murasu.

You’ll need to bring your NRIC and the Original Death Certificate of the deceased. Payment for the obituary can be made via credit card, NETS, or cash (during office hours only).

Details to include in the obituary:

– Photo of deceased
– Name of deceased and alias, if any
– Date of death (time is optional)
– Names of family members. If any family member is deceased, name should be within brackets with a word deceased or late, e.g. (Lim Ah Chai, deceased) or (Late Lim Ah Chai)
– Location, date, and time of the funeral and prayers
– Details of service and prayers, including date, time, and location
– Burial or cremation details with the name of the cemetery or crematorium and time. Include any message that you wish your visitors to take note of.

See more details here on placement of obituary during office hours

For The Straits Times and Berita Harian, you can also place the obituary online here.

Here is a quick guide on how to place an obituary online.

sample-obituary via sphobit.com.sg

Sample Obituary via sphobit.com.sg

Step 4: Engaging a Professional and Reliable Funeral Director to Conduct A Dignified Funeral, Wake, Procession & Burial

Once you’ve obtained the Certificate of Cause of Death (CCOD), you may engage a professional funeral director who will collect on your behalf the body from your home, hospital, or mortuary, send it for embalming (to delay the decomposition of the body), and deliver it to the location of the funeral wake.

How Much Is A Funeral Service In Singapore?

A funeral is an important ceremony for the bereaved family and friends. It is the time when they will remember the deceased. They will be in the company of family members and close friends. The funeral service is a celebration of life as well as a memorial service to the departed. Funeral services are held at different places depending on the type of service.

The three primary factors that determine the total cost of the funeral include the type and duration of the service, as well as the choice of casket used. Here are some funeral service package prices for your reference:

Buddhist funeral services (3 to 5 days) $4,188 to $25,888
Taoist funeral services (3 to 5 days) $6,888 to $31,888
Christian funeral services (3 to 5 days) $3,888 to $18,888
Catholic funeral services (3 to 5 days) $3,888 to $18,888
Soka funeral services (3 to 5 days) $3,888 to $18,888
Free Thinker (non religious) funeral services (3 to 5 days) $3,888 to $18,888

Casket Prices in Singapore for Reference:

Light wood casket (wood veneer, pine, poplar): Around S$700 to S$1,000
Hardwood casket (oak, mahogany, cherry): Around S$2,000 to S$10,000
Eco-friendly casket (recycled paper): Around S$1,000

funeral wakes in singapore

Your funeral director will also organize and carry out all the necessary logistics for the funeral wake, including getting the necessary permits to hold the funeral wake, setting up the funeral wake or funeral parlour, arranging the prayers according to the deceased’s religion, preparing the hearse for the procession, and more.

Most funeral service providers will offer affordable funeral packages that cover everything that a proper funeral requires to send off the deceased in a dignified way.

Step 5: Arranging the Funeral Wake at Home, at a HDB void deck, or at a Funeral Parlour

Depending on the deceased or the family’s personal preference, the funeral wake can be conducted at home, at a HDB void deck, or at a funeral parlour with more facilities. 

A funeral wake serves the purpose of allowing family members, friends, and acquaintances to pay their respects to the deceased. This is also where they can offer company and comfort for the grieving family. 

Depending on where the funeral wake will be held, the following permissions are required:

  • Permit to hold the wake at the void deck from the Town Council
  • Permit to use part of the road outside a landed property from the Land Transport Authority (LTA)
  • Permit to extend the funeral wake for more than 7 days from the National Environment Agency (NEA)

Your funeral director will be able to assist you with getting the necessary approvals.

Step 6: Preparing for Burial (or Cremation and Ash Management) of Your Loved One

Depending on the wishes and religion of the departed, the body of the deceased may be buried or cremated. With your NRIC and the Original Death Certificate that contains the permit to bury or cremate, you may book a date and time for burial or cremation online or through the phone with the relevant office. 

For the relevant contacts and fees of burial or cremation booking, please refer to this reference page by the National Environment Agency (NEA)

Step 7: Storage of Ashes or Scattering the Ashes of the Deceased at Sea or Inland

Every family will have their own preference in terms of the management of the deceased’s ashes. The 2 common options are:

1. Storing the ashes at home or in a columbarium. One can choose a private columbarium such as Nirvana Memorial Garden, or a government-managed columbarium (Choa Chu Kang Columbarium or Mandai Columbarium) in Singapore. When booking a niche (the space to store the ashes), please have your NRIC and the original Death Certificate of your loved one ready. You may contact the private columbarium or book the niche online at a government-managed columbarium.

2. Scattering the ashes at sea at the approved site 1.5 nautical miles (or 2.8km) south of Pulau Semakau from 7am to 7pm. Please contact the Port Marine Safety Control Centre at +65 6325 2488 for more info and assistance on scattering the ashes at sea. If you prefer inland ash scattering, you may do so at the Garden of Peace @ CCK (Inland Ash Scattering Garden) with thoughtful landscaping and greenery for dignified and respectful ash scattering at Choa Chu Kang Cemetery Complex which is open from 9am to 5pm daily. You can submit your ash scattering application online at NEA’s ePortal (fees applicable) and you will have 2 hours to complete the ash scattering and the necessary rites.

If you need any assistance with preparing for a funeral for your loved one, please don’t hesitate to contact us for help. We are always at your service 24/7. You can call or WhatsApp us anytime at +65 8823 7979.

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We are always here for you 7 days a week to take your call when you need us in times of sorrow.

100% Transparency Funeral Packages

Honesty is the best policy. This is how we run our business always. No hidden charges GUARANTEED.

Funeral Services from the Heart

100% Trustworthy. 100% Commitment. 100% from the Heart. That’s what we offer to all our customers.

Experienced Funeral Directors

All our funeral directors have been in this line helping many find peace at heart for more than a decade.

Let us introduce ourselves…

A few words about Elite Funeral Services…

Having been in the funeral services for over a decade, we believe in giving 100% to provide dignified funerals to anyone, regardless of their wealth, status, race, or religion. We understand that grieving for our loved ones is an arduous and challenging phase. That is why we work hard to keep the process stress-free and our services affordable for everyone.

How it all came to be…

Our Vision As A Funeral Service Provider

Over the years, we realized that being a funeral director is a very challenging responsibility, and yet a very meaningful one. Because we are not only giving the deceased a proper and dignified farewell but also helping the living to find peace at heart and letting go of the grief. Hence, our vision of helping others always come first. Business comes second.

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funerals planned

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families at peace

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working for you

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Thoughtful, Honest & Committed Funeral Service Team to Help Families Grieve with Peace of Heart

We Strive to Provide The Best Funeral Services in Singapore

Buddhist Funeral Service Package

Our Buddhist funeral services start from $4,188 for 3 days (Basic Funeral Package) to $25,888 for 5 days (VIP Funeral Package). This Buddhist funeral package covers all essential services including a embalming handling and encoffin service (Comfort C-Class Casket/Lotus Casket), preparation of memorial ceremony, coordination of Buddhist funeral service and ceremony, full funeral procession service, and after-care service.

Taoist Funeral Service Package

Our Taoist funeral services start from $6,888 for 3 days (Basic Funeral Package) to $31,888 for 5 days (VIP Funeral Package). This Taoist funeral package covers all essential services including a embalming handling and encoffin service (Comfort C-Class Casket/Lotus Casket), preparation of memorial ceremony, coordination of Taoist funeral service and ceremony, full funeral procession service, and after-care service.

Christian Funeral Service Package

Our Christian funeral services start from $3,888 for 3 days (Basic Funeral Package) to $18,888 for 5 days (VIP Funeral Package). This Christian funeral package covers all essential services including a embalming handling and encoffin service (Comfort C-Class Casket/6-Sided Casket/Grand Deluxe Casket), preparation of memorial ceremony, coordination of Christian funeral service and ceremony, full funeral procession service, and after-care service.

Catholic Funeral Service Package

Our Roman Catholic funeral services start from $3,888 for 3 days (Basic Funeral Package) to $18,888 for 5 days (VIP Funeral Package). This Roman Catholic funeral package covers all essential services including a embalming handling and encoffin service (Comfort C-Class Casket/6-Sided Casket/Grand Deluxe Casket), preparation of memorial ceremony, coordination of Catholic funeral service and ceremony, full funeral procession service, and after-care service.

Soka Funeral Service Package

Our Soka funeral services start from $3,888 for 3 days (Basic Funeral Package) to $18,888 for 5 days (VIP Funeral Package). This Soka funeral package covers all essential services including a embalming handling and encoffin service (Comfort C-Class Casket/6-Sided Casket/Grand Deluxe Casket), preparation of memorial ceremony, coordination of Soka funeral service and ceremony, full funeral procession service, and after-care service.

Free Thinker Funeral Service Package

Our Free Thinker funeral services start from $3,888 for 3 days (Basic Funeral Package) to $18,888 for 5 days (VIP Funeral Package). This Free Thinker funeral package covers all essential services including a embalming handling and encoffin service (Comfort C-Class Casket/6-Sided Casket/Grand Deluxe Casket), preparation of memorial ceremony, coordination of Free Thinker funeral service and ceremony, funeral procession, and after-care service.

Our Funeral Services in Singapore (Gallery)

Funeral Wake Guide | Useful Tips On Attending Funerals in Singapore

If you’ve never attended a funeral before, it is quite common to have questions about funeral etiquette, like how you should appropriately dress and behave, since Singapore is a multi-racial nation. This quick guide will provide you with the info you need so you can avoid unnecessary awkwardness, lack of empathy or even disrespect towards the grieving family when you are attending a funeral.

Regardless of religion, most of the customs about post-death rituals are passed down through the generations. Therefore it is important to be aware of these age-old practices, especially for certain superstitions. If you are unsure, feel free to check with your funeral director.

About Funeral Wakes in Singapore

In Singapore, a funeral wake at a void deck, funeral home or parlour, or a residence is a gathering for a deceased person. Conventionally, funeral wakes are announced in the obituary section of the local newspaper. These days, more and more people are notifying their relatives and friends about the wake via digital means such as via WhatsApp or even a Facebook post. Funeral wakes where we meet in recognition of the departed’s life and to give support to the family of the departed. At the funeral wake, the casket can be either closed or open for wake visitors to pay their final respects and say goodbye to the deceased.

Funeral wakes are usually held at HDB void decks, a funeral home or funeral parlour, or at the family member’s home. If a part of the road beyond the house boundaries are necessary, such as at a landed property, an official Traffic Police (TP) permit is required. For a funeral wake at the public HDB void deck, you can get a permit for the funeral wake from your local Town Council.

Wake traditions vary from culture to culture, according to the family’s religion. Generally, funeral wakes starts in the late afternoon or evening for an odd number of days (3 days, 5 days, or 7 days) with family members taking turns for the nightlong vigil, although it is not compulsory. An important thing to remember – any family who intends to extend the funeral wake beyond 7 days must get approval from the National Environmental Agency (NEA). You can write to the following address:

National Environment Agency
Memorial Facilities & Planning Division
40 Scotts Road
Environment Building, #21-00
Singapore 228231

At the funeral wake, immediate family members and close friends will receive wake attendees and serve food and drink refreshments to the visitors. This is where fellow relatives, friends, and acquaintances can console the bereaved family and share the fond memories you have about the departed.

Funeral Dress Codes for Different Races & Religions

Depending on the race, culture, and religion, there are certain etiquettes on the dress code to pay attention to. To be conservative, wake guests should wear attire in neutral, subdued colours, such as white, black, or dark shades of blue or brown. Bright colours such as yellow, red, or orange that signify prosperity and happiness should be avoided. Feel free to check with your funeral director if you are unsure.

Chinese Funeral Dress Code

When attending a Chinese funeral wake, the common attire colours are white, black, and sombre colours such as dark blue or dark brown. Avoid wearing bright colours (such as red, orange, or yellow) and jewellery or flashy accessories.

Muslim Funeral Dress Code

When attending a Muslim funeral wake, dress modestly in white or dark colours, preferably long sleeves and pants/skirts of at least knee-length. Non-muslim ladies are encouraged to wear a headscarf to show respect for the religion. For the prayer session, shoes need to be removed, so be sure to wear a clean pair of socks with no holes to show your respect for the deceased.

Indian Funeral Dress Code

When attending an Indian funeral, dress in a casual and simple manner in white long sleeves (do avoid black). For ladies, you can wear a headscarf and simple jewellery without being flashy.

Offering Condolences & Gifts or Donations to the Bereaved Family

There are fixed rules on how to express your heartfelt condolences, but you should always be sympathetic and listen with compassion when you visit the bereaved family, whether you’re friends, colleagues or just acquaintances. Avoid gossiping about the death of the deceased at the funeral wake.

For a condolence gift, you can send a traditional funeral flower wreath to the funeral wake or funeral parlour as a token of respect and compassion. Do check on the appropriate flowers for different religions before you send them to avoid awkwardness or offending the grieving family.

It is also a common practice to offer monetary gifts or donations at a funeral wake, especially at a Chinese funeral (the money gift is called “white gold” or “pek kim”) to help offset the funeral costs. Use a plain white envelope (avoid red or other bright striking colours). You can offer a minimum of $30 or $50 (think odd number) if you are not so close, and much more if you are close to the family or if you wish to help more. A family member or close family friend will usually be posted at the entrance of the funeral wake to receive guests and donations, as well as record the guests’ names and contributions.

To add a personal touch, you can add a handwritten sympathy card with a sincere, respectful message to console them, empathize with the family’s loss and remember the departed, along with the funeral flowers you are sending to the bereaved family on the day of the funeral.

Paying Your Respects at a Funeral Wake

Although it is common sense, it is important for you to approach (and introduce yourself if necessary) the bereaved family first to offer your condolences, instead of finding your friends among the guests when you arrive at the funeral wake. Be sure to silent your mobile phone first before entering the funeral wake because having your phone ringing during the funeral service is very disrespectful. Refrain yourself from taking photos or videos (and posting on social media) unless requested by the bereaved family, because this is a violation of the family’s privacy.

To pay your respects, tribute and well-wishes to the departed, you can bow your head for a few seconds with a quiet prayer in front of the altar where the deceased is placed in an open casket or a closed one nearby. This is acceptable for most religions. For Chinese funerals, if you are ok to hold joss sticks or incense, a family member will hand you joss sticks to pay respects to the departed.

The length of time you spend at the funeral wake depends on how close you are to the members of the bereaved family. You may want to stay longer to show your support if a family member is a close friend. Depending on the situation, you may also offer some help or run some errands for the family.

If you have young children, it may be best to leave them with a relative or trusted friend or babysitter because they may disrupt the funeral (especially during the prayer or eulogy session) as they may not fully comprehend the purpose of a funeral or even what is going on. For older children, you should let them choose if they wish to attend the funeral and not force them to attend grudgingly.

Snacks and Drinks

At funeral wakes in Singapore (especially at Chinese funerals), it is common that guests will seat themselves at round tables, sharing memories of the departed. There will usually be snacks, packet drinks, or bottled water for the guests.

When to Leave the Funeral Wake

Refrain yourself from leaving the funeral wake in the middle of a praying session or during the eulogy. To show respect, wait for the rituals to be completed before informing the bereaved family that you are leaving.

Following the Funeral Procession

A cortège or funeral procession the family, relatives, and close friends follow the coffin of the deceased carried by a pallbearer team of 4, or more commonly nowadays by a hearse, a vehicle for conveying the coffin. The funeral procession begins customarily at the funeral wake or funeral home, or at the home of the departed and ends at the burial or cremation location. The funeral director, funeral minister, priest, or pastor will usually lead the group that follows on foot.

Funeral Services Singapore (Covid-19 Restrictions)

With the easing of COVID-19 restrictions in Singapore, the gathering limit for funeral wakes has been increased to up to 30 people since August 2021. This means fellow relatives, friends, and acquaintances can come and go at different times over the course of a wake as long as there is only a maximum of 30pax at any point. Please check the latest updates on COVID-19 restrictions here: https://www.gov.sg/article/updates-to-singapores-covid-19-measures-from-19-august-2021

If you need any assistance with funeral services in Singapore, please feel free to contact us at Elite Funeral Services via our 24-hour hotline 8823 7979.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on Funeral Planning & Arrangements (Updated 24 April 2022)

Planning for the funeral of a loved one is an inevitable part of life that most of us have to go through. The funeral arrangements can be simple or elaborate, depending on your religious or custom requirements.

Here are some frequently asked questions (FAQs) about funeral arrangements:

1. Call us at 8823 7979 (24-hour hotline) to confirm the location of the funeral wake or to reserve a funeral parlour.

2. Obtain a Certificate of Cause of Death (CCOD) issued by a doctor or Forensic Death Investigator from the Ministry of Health.

3. With the CCOD, you can then register the death at the hospital or police station with your NRIC or passport and the deceased’s NRIC or passport within 24 hours of the death and inform the place of burial or cremation.

4. Upon registration of the death, the CCOD will be retained by the death registration centre and a Death Certificate will be issued so you can place an obituary and make arrangements for cremation or burial. Please prepare a set of clothes and a photograph for enlargement for the funeral.

5. Call and inform us at 8823 7979 (24-hour hotline) and we will come and collect your loved one. Our funeral advisor will guide you step by step on the full funeral service arrangements.

Read our 7-step funeral guide for more details

A: Here are a few key things to take note of:

FUNERAL WAKE

You need to decide on the duration and the location of the funeral wake, whether it’ll be at the void deck, parlour, or in a home.

Nowadays, the usual duration for funerals ranges from 3 to 5 days. In the case where the funeral extends more than 7 days, prior written permission must be obtained from the National Environment Agency (NEA).

For a funeral held at a void deck, a permit from the Town Council is required. If the funeral wake is held in a landed property and part of the road is needed, a permit from the Traffic Police is required. At Elite Funeral Services, we help all our customers to handle this administration work.

Feel free to call us at our 24-hour hotline 8823 7979 for more info.

BURIAL OR CREMATION

At Elite Funeral Services, we also help you with the booking of a slot for cremation or burial.

The documents required for this burial/cremation booking are the NRIC of the applicant and next-of-kin, and the original Death Certificate, which contains the Permit to Bury/Cremate.

If you have any questions or concerns about the burial or cremation process, please feel free to contact us anytime at our 24-hour hotline at 8823 7979.

ASH MANAGEMENT

The ashes of the deceased can be stored at home or in a columbarium (government-managed or private) after the cremation process. Your NRIC and the original Death Certificate is required to book a niche.

Ashes of the deceased may also be scattered daily from 7am to 7pm at sea at a site located about 2.8 km south of Pulau Semakau designated by Maritime Port Authority. Please contact the MPA’s Port Marine Safety Control Centre for more info at 6325 2488.

Some families prefer inland ash scattering at Garden of Peace, the designated garden located at Choa Chu Kang Cemetery. For booking and more details on the documents required for inland ash scattering, please refer to this page.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENT UNDER COVID-19 SITUATION

In view of the current COVID-19 situation, safe management measures are put in place at funerals and funeral wakes. Please refer to this page for more info on funeral arrangements under the current COVID-19 situation.

A funeral is an important ceremony for the bereaved family and friends. It is the time when they will remember the deceased. They will be in the company of family members and close friends. The funeral service is a celebration of life as well as a memorial service to the departed. Funeral services in Singapore are held at different places depending on the type of service.

The three primary factors that determine the total cost of the funeral include the type and duration of the service, as well as the choice of casket used. Here are some funeral service package prices for your reference:

Buddhist funeral services (3 to 5 days) $4,188 to $25,888
Taoist funeral services (3 to 5 days) $6,888 to $31,888
Christian funeral services (3 to 5 days) $3,888 to $18,888
Catholic funeral services (3 to 5 days) $3,888 to $18,888
Soka funeral services (3 to 5 days) $3,888 to $18,888
Free Thinker (non religious) funeral services (3 to 5 days) $3,888 to $18,888

Casket Prices in Singapore for Reference:

Light wood casket (wood veneer, pine, poplar): Around S$700 to S$1,000
Hardwood casket (oak, mahogany, cherry): Around S$2,000 to S$10,000
Eco-friendly casket (recycled paper): Around S$1,000

At Elite Funeral Services, we offer both budget and luxury funeral packages for all religions in Singapore. So whether you need an affordable and professional funeral or a grander funeral for your loved one, our experienced team can help you handle everything from start to finish according to your preferences. Feel free to contact us anytime via our 24-hour hotline at +65 8823 7979 for more info and assistance on funeral arrangements.

A: There are 3 crematoriums in Singapore:

  1. Mandai Crematorium at 300 Mandai Road which accepts cremation for all religions
  2. Bright Hill Temple at 88 Bright Hill Road which accepts cremation for Buddhists and Taoists
  3. Tse Tho Aum Crematorium at 601 Sin Ming Drive which accepts cremation for Buddhists and Taoists

At Elite Funeral Services, our funeral packages include the cremation fees and ashes collection for Mandai Crematorium. See all our funeral packages here or call us anytime via our 24-hour hotline 8823 7979.

A: Embalming is a process of preserving the deceased’s body to delay decomposition by draining blood out from the arteries and replacing them with embalming fluid, and sucking out remaining liquid or gases in hollow organs like the lungs, stomach, and kidneys before filling them with embalming fluid.

Here’s are the 2 main steps of an embalming process:

1. Arterial Embalming: The blood is drained from the arteries before replacing them with embalming fluid (formaldehyde-based chemical solutions).

2. Cavity Embalming: Hollow organs such as the lungs, stomach, kidneys, and intestines are punctured using a trocar before being drained of all remaining liquid and gases using an aspirator and then filled up with the embalming fluid. The aspiration process and injection of embalming fluid are repeated as many times as possible. As these hollow organs might become breeding grounds for potentially for microbes and bacteria, cavity embalming is an essential process to ensure that the body is well-embalmed.

*Embalming is commonly known as 打针 (informal term) or 防腐 (formal term) in Mandarin, and “pa zam” in Hokkien).

It is a common misconception that the embalming process involves removing the internal organs from the deceased’s body. Embalming is usually done by draining blood out from the arteries of the deceased and replacing them with preservatives fluids (formaldehyde-based chemical solutions) while keeping the internal organs intact.

However, for autopsy cases to determine the cause of death where the body has to be dissected, the organs would be removed and placed in the preservatives fluid before being placed back into the deceased’s body.

A: It is not mandated by law for bodies to be embalmed for a funeral wake. If you are arranging a funeral for viewing or an open casket (or if the body is to be transported across borders or long distances), embalming is necessary to preserve the body of the deceased. If you prefer to skip the embalming, the body of the deceased can be placed in a coffin without a viewing panel and sealed hermetically for up to 7 days before burial or cremation.

Embalming is a professional procedure carried out to delay the decomposition of the body. The bodily fluids are removed and then replaced with formaldehyde-based chemical solutions that will delay the decomposition of the body.

At Elite Funeral Services, we provide professional embalming and makeup services for all our customers. If necessary, our professional embalmers can also help put the dentures back in the mouth of the deceased. Please note that embalming may not be allowed if the deceased passed away due to certain infectious diseases. Feel free to contact us anytime for more info at our 24-hour hotline 8823 7979.

A: The types of services and products covered in a funeral package varies according to the preferences, customs, and religious beliefs of the family. For more info on funeral packages for respective religions, please refer to our funeral packages here or call us at our 24-hour hotline 8823 7979.

At Elite Funeral Services, we also provide very affordable funeral parlour packages (starting from just $3,888) for families who prefer a more private and more comfortable ambience for the funeral.

These funeral parlours are conducive funeral spaces with air-conditioned seating areas, high-speed WiFi, and private washrooms for the comfort of the bereaved family and their guests.

Here are the available funeral parlours:

  • Sin Ming Funeral Parlour
  • Geylang Bahru Parlour
  • Teochew Parlour @ Ubi
  • Tampines Funeral Parlour
  • Church Funeral Parlour

Please see this page for more details on funeral parlours and this page for our funeral parlour packages.

At Elite Funeral Services, we provide the service of engaging established Buddhist Monks, Taoist Priests, Christian Pastors, and Catholic Funeral Ministers for our customers. So you can leave it to us to arrange a suitable religious leader for the required rites if you do not have the time to find one.

For more details, feel free to call us anytime via our 24-hour hotline 8823 7979 

One of the most important things you can do for the grieving family is simply be there for them. Listen to them, give them your undivided attention and don’t try to force them to “get over it” as fast as they can. Give them time and space to grieve in their own way and at their own pace. You can comfort the grieving family with words such as “He/She is in a better place now.”

When you are going to a Taoist funeral, you should wear dark colors. Black, gray, brown or navy blue are the most common colors you will see. You should avoid wearing bright colors as they can agitate the spirits of the dead.

White is the traditional colour for mourners at a Buddhist funeral. It is disrespectful to the deceased to wear brightly coloured clothing to a Buddhist funeral. Wearing bright, fanciful colours is seen as distracting the mourners from their grief.

We are a sincere, empathetic, and committed funeral service team who strives to provide the best funeral services in Singapore. Our team is very familiar with the customs, rituals and rites for different funerals, so you can be assured of professional and proper funeral planning, organization and provision for your loved one. We offer both affordable and luxury funeral service packages with transparent pricing to suit different budgets and preferences for families in Singapore.

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Elite Funeral Services

Reliable & Affordable
One-Stop Funeral Services with Transparent Pricing
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Direct Cremation (火化)
From $1,200

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From $3,888

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Call Us: +65 8823 7979